Norwegians Turning Back the Clock

Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time – often referred to as “Summer Time”, “DST” or “Daylight Savings Time” – is a way of making better use of the daylight in the evenings by setting the clocks forward one hour during the longer days of summer, and back again in the fall. Tonight, 27 October, Norwegians are turning back the clock from 03:00 AM to 02:00 AM. 

Clocks back or forward?

The clock moves ahead (= losing one hour) in the spring when DST starts, and falls back one hour (= gaining one hour) when DST ends in the fall. To remember which way the clock goes, keep in mind one of these sayings: “spring forward, fall back” or “spring ahead, fall behind.”

Northern Hemisphere

Many countries in the northern hemisphere observe DST, but not all. Daylight saving time begins in the northern hemisphere between March–April and ends between September–November. Standard time begins in the northern hemisphere between September–November and ends between March–April.

Why observe DST?

Many countries observe DST, and many do not. Many countries use DST to make better use of the daylight in the evenings. Many people believe that DST could be linked to fewer road accidents and injuries. The extra hour of daylight in the evening is said to give children more social time and can boost the tourism industry because it increases the amount of outdoor activities.

DST is also used to save energy and reduce artificial light needed during the evening hours — clocks are set one hour ahead during the spring, and one hour back to standard time in the autumn. However, many studies disagree about DST’s energy savings and while some studies show a positive outcome, others do not.

It is difficult to predict what will happen with Daylight Saving Time in the future. The daylight saving date in many countries may change from time to time due to special events or conditions.

The Norwegian DST start date is the last Sunday in March through to the last Sunday in October. United States, Canada and some other countries extended DST in 2007. The new start date is the second Sunday in March through to the first Sunday in November.


Illustrating photo by: NRK

Source: timeanddate.com

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Categories: Nature

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