Edvard Munch – ’The Modern Eye Exhibition’ Across Europe

Munch - valsEdvard Munch is acclaimed for his vivid Symbolist painting and regarded as a pioneer of Expressionism.

Prepared together with the Centre Pompidou Musée National d’Art Moderne in Paris, the exhibition in Schirn offers a novel view of his work. It is for the first time that Munch’s interest in modern techniques of creating pictures such as photography and film and modern stage designs is the focus of attention. His works reveal to what degree he adopted specifically photographic or filmic forms of composition and narration, poses, or even effects in his painting.

Supplementing the presentation of about sixty paintings and twenty works on paper, one chapter of the show is dedicated to Munch’s own attempts in the field of photography and film. A further dimension of the exhibition reveals how the artist dealt with one and the same subject in drawing, photography, painting, graphic art, and sculpture. The artist’s frequent return to already rendered motifs provides a crucial key to the understanding of Munch’s work.

Nearly 500,000 visitors visited the exhibition at the Pompidou Center in Paris. Now, the exhibition has moved to the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, and was officially opened February 8th 2012.

Munch Death in the sickroomFurther on, the exhibition will be shown at the Tate Modern in London from June 28th to October 12th. The Grand Finale will be held at the Munch museum in Oslo.

Edvard Munch is regarded as the most famous painter in Norway ever and he has painted famous paintings such as ‘The Scream’, ‘Madonna’ and ‘Death in the Sickroom’. In addition to the general Expressionistic influences, Munch was also inspired by silent movies and magazines. This is shown in the exhibition and provides a refreshing perspective on Munch, says chief curator at the Munch Museum Ingebjørg Ydstie to Norwegian Broadcasting.

 

Text by: Anette Broteng Christiansen, ThorNews

Source: Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, Norwegian Broadcast

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Categories: Art, Culture

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